How Hungry Would You Have To Be To Eat Your Fork? New Edible Cutlery Could Well Eliminate The Need For The Plastic Kind

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Polystyrene In Plastic Cutlery Is Wasteful And Potentially Damaging–One Man’s Solution: Edible Silverware

So you say you’re an environmentalist, huh? But are you committed, I mean really committed?

You may feel like you need to be committed if you were to watch the video linked below with no context. As the man cheerfully takes a bite of his spoon, the first thing that might occur to you–especially if you’ve been to visit the dentist lately–is OUCH!

But never fear. The spoons are edible, a part of line of edible cutlery which also includes forks and chopsticks, invented by the enterprising Narayana Peesapaty of Hyderabad India. They are called Bakeys, and are made of a delicious-sounding blend of millet, rice and wheat flours, baked–of course–and boasting a three-year shelf life.

And when was the last time you ate with a fork that came with its own flavor? Forget about formal dinners where you have to remember your oyster fork from your salad fork. With Bakeys you get three flavors: plain, several varieties of sweet, including cinnamon-ginger and ginger-mint–and spicy–the latter of which is made with a mix of black pepper, cumin and caraway seed.

And all joking aside, it is an invention whose time has come. Plastic forks and spoons are something ubiquitous in modern life, but something we don’t really think about. And while most people have been educated about the dangers of polystyrene as it relates to Styrofoam boxes and other containers, most people don’t realizes that plastic cutlery is also made of the poisonous stuff.

Not only has polystyrene been categorized as a possible carcinogen, exposure to it can cause upper respiratory distress, irritation of the eyes and skin, and chronic exposure can even lead to nervous system damage, headache, fatigue and negative effects on kidney function.

And of course, there are those landfills that sit full of plastic, much of which won’t fully degrade for half a century or more. Another great thing about Bakeys is that even if you choose not to eat them, they will decompose in four or five days tops. Plus if any animals eat them, they are likely to be quite pleased with their choice, as opposed to animals and birds who consume pieces of plastic as it degrades, leading to health problems and even death.

If we can make even a small dent in that ugly legacy we’re leaving behind, and do it in a delicious way, then why not try to make a difference, one bite at a time.

Edible Silverware Could Cut Down on Plastic Waste and Pollution


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